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Dancing Senegal Parrot

Kili

Type: Senegal Parrot
Genus: Poicephalus
Species: Senegalus
Subspecies: Mesotypus
Sex: Female
Weight: 120 grams
Height: 9 inches
Age: 9 years
Caped Cape Parrot

Truman

Type: Cape Parrot
Genus: Poicephalus
Species:Robustus
Subspecies: Fuscicollis
Sex: Male
Weight: 330 grams
Height: 13 inches
Age: 7 years, 3 months
Trick Training Guides
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Additional Top Articles
Treat Selection
Evolution of Flight
Clipping Wings
How to Put Parrot In Cage
Kili's Stroller Trick
Camping Parrots
Socialization
Truman's Tree
Parrot Wizard Seminar
Kili on David Letterman
Cape Parrot Review
Roudybush Pellets

List of Common Parrots:

Parakeets:
Budgerigar (Budgie)
Alexandrine Parakeet
African Ringneck
Indian Ringneck
Monk Parakeet (Quaker Parrot)

Parrotlets:
Mexican Parrotlet
Green Rumped Parrotlet
Blue Winged Parrotlet
Spectacled Parrotlet
Dusky Billed Parrotlet
Pacific Parrotlet
Yellow Faced Parrotlet

Lovebirds:
Peach Faced Lovebird
Masked Lovebird
Fischer's Lovebird
Lilian's (Nyasa) Lovebird
Black Cheeked Lovebird
Madagascar Lovebird
Abyssinian Lovebird
Red Faced Lovebird
Swindern's Lovebird

Lories and Lorikeets:
Rainbow Lorikeet

Conures:
Sun Conure
Jenday Conure
Cherry Headed Conure
Blue Crowned Conure
Mitred Conure
Patagonian Conure
Green Cheeked Conure
Nanday Conure

Caiques:
Black Headed Caique
White Bellied Caique

Poicephalus Parrots:
Senegal Parrot
Meyer's Parrot
Red Bellied Parrot
Brown Headed Parrot
Jardine's Parrot
Cape Parrot
Ruppell's Parrot

Eclectus:
Eclectus Parrot

African Greys:
Congo African Grey (CAG)
Timneh African Grey (TAG)

Amazons:
Blue Fronted Amazon
Yellow Naped Amazon
Yellow Headed Amazon
Orange Winged Amazon
Yellow Crowned Amazon

Cockatoos:
Cockatiel
Galah (Rose Breasted) Cockatoo
Sulphur Crested Cockatoo
Umbrella Cockatoo
Moluccan Cockatoo
Bare Eyed Cockatoo
Goffin's Cockatoo

Macaws:
Red Shouldered (Hahn's) Macaw
Severe Macaw
Blue And Gold Macaw
Blue Throated Macaw
Military Macaw
Red Fronted Macaw
Scarlet Macaw
Green Winged Macaw
Hyacinth Macaw

Dancing Green-Winged Macaw

Comments (5)

By Michael Sazhin

Tuesday January 14th, 2014

It's now been 3 weeks since I brought Santina home from the rescue. She has adjusted very well. She is now pretty good about stepping up, allows me to pet her all over, and is just beginning to play with toys. Best of all, she has not bit me a single time since she came from the rescue.

Why doesn't Santina bite me? Is it because I'm fearless of that giant beak? Cause she's afraid of getting sent back to the rescue? Or cause I possess magical powers of telecommunication with animals? No. It's because of my approach to parrot training! Simply put, I don't do anything that will cause the bird to bite and then I start teaching it what appropriate behavior is from the very simplest of things. I don't take anything for granted. I act like I am dealing with a clueless animal that is nothing more than an attack machine. And I begin from square one, how to be near me. Then I work on taking treats from me, stepping up, touch, grab, etc. I don't do anything the bird doesn't want and then I make it such so that the parrot wants to do what I do want. Then it's just a matter of time until that bird blossoms into the pet I expect it to be. The only variables are how much effort and time it will take. The rest... is just the Wizard's approach.

But enough of the status update, here's what I'm sure you've been waiting for... Santina's first music video, Green-Winged Macaw Dancing to Barbie Girl. The folks at the rescue told me she goes nuts for this song so here she is, Santina the Barbie Macaw!



Part of: Taming & Basic Training, Blog Announcements, Macaws, Rescue
Santina Green-Winged Macaw Dance Dancing Music Video
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Comments

Post Your Response

Dbeguy

Posted on January 14, 2014 09:45PM

This REALLY made me smile Santina seems so happy. She's so lucky to have you Michael I was wondering a couple of things though: How do you tell the difference between nervous head-bobbing & happy head bobbing? Is that your niece in the video? Do you expect any problems with integrating Santina into your flock when her quarantine is done? Cheers!


Michael

Posted on January 15, 2014 01:26AM

The difference between nervous head bobbing or happy head bobbing, aggressive eye pinning or happy eye pinning, etc comes down to whether you get nailed at the end of it! It's excitement behavior and the context is evaluated by consequence. It's hard to tell a super happy from a super pissed bird apart. There may be some lunging and beak throwing in addition to show the more aggressive type. That's my little sister. And I have no idea about the integration. I suspect Santina and Truman will get along. I'm too afraid Kili will try to bully Santina and then get killed so I gotta keep them apart. We'll see. I've got other issues to resolve before that happens.

Dbeguy

Posted on January 15, 2014 05:59PM

[quote="Michael":21z4v873] I suspect Santina and Truman will get along. I'm too afraid Kili will try to bully Santina and then get killed so I gotta keep them apart. We'll see. I've got other issues to resolve before that happens.[/quote:21z4v873] I do have hopeful news on this point. According to the video below (jump to 45:00) parrot fights are essentially bluster because they can't afford to be injured. I'm always wary of "experts" on the internet (Obviously you've passed the test ;) ), but several members of the audience support this assertion, saying that: it sounds like they're going to kill each other but no injuries come about. qbjanoNW-70[/youtube:21z4v873]


Michael

Posted on January 15, 2014 07:40PM

What a load of bullshit. I know birds that have had entire feet ripped off, beaks torn off, and other massive injuries. While many species of parrots get along and don't fight hard, there are others that fight to the death. Amazonas, Poicephalus, Melopsytacus have been known to inflict death or major injuries. The danger is that Santina is like 10 times bigger than Kili. It doesn't matter what the intention is, if she throws one bite at her, that could be fatal or cause a serious injury. So it's not a simple thing. These are species not only differing in size but also by continent, climate, and lifestyle. PS I wouldn't put an ounce of weight on anything this woman says. I just jumped to a random point on the video and heard her say "You have a bird on your arm, they can feel your pulse. And they will know where you sit. They will know if you are upset, stressed, excited." She's just making this up. Nobody can genuinely know what the bird knows and to claim to know is crazy. Obviously she hasn't experienced aggressive parrots that want to kill each other and she likes to make up what the parrot is thinking.

Greencheek13653

Posted on August 14, 2014 03:06AM

[quote="Michael":3qaem95k]What a load of bullshit. I know birds that have had entire feet ripped off, beaks torn off, and other massive injuries. While many species of parrots get along and don't fight hard, there are others that fight to the death. Amazonas, Poicephalus, Melopsytacus have been known to inflict death or major injuries. The danger is that Santina is like 10 times bigger than Kili. It doesn't matter what the intention is, if she throws one bite at her, that could be fatal or cause a serious injury. So it's not a simple thing. These are species not only differing in size but also by continent, climate, and lifestyle. PS I wouldn't put an ounce of weight on anything this woman says. I just jumped to a random point on the video and heard her say "You have a bird on your arm, they can feel your pulse. And they will know where you sit. They will know if you are upset, stressed, excited." She's just making this up. Nobody can genuinely know what the bird knows and to claim to know is crazy. Obviously she hasn't experienced aggressive parrots that want to kill each other and she likes to make up what the parrot is thinking.[/quote:3qaem95k] Potty mouth

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Trained Parrot is a blog about how to train tricks to all parrots and parakeets. Read about how I teach tricks to Truman the Brown Necked Cape Parrot including flight recall, shake, wave, nod, turn around, fetch, wings, and play dead. Learn how you can train tricks to your Parrot, Parrotlet, Parakeet, Lovebird, Cockatiel, Conure, African Grey, Amazon, Cockatoo or Macaw. This blog is better than books or DVDs because the information is real, live, and completely free of charge. If you want to know how to teach your parrot tricks then you will enjoy this free parrot training tutorial.
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