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Dancing Senegal Parrot

Kili

Type: Senegal Parrot
Genus: Poicephalus
Species: Senegalus
Subspecies: Mesotypus
Sex: Female
Weight: 120 grams
Height: 9 inches
Age: 5 years, 10 months
Caped Cape Parrot

Truman

Type: Cape Parrot
Genus: Poicephalus
Species:Robustus
Subspecies: Fuscicollis
Sex: Male
Weight: 330 grams
Height: 13 inches
Age: 4 years, 1 month
Trick Training Guides
Taming & Training Guide
Flight Recall
Target
Wave
Fetch
Shake
Bat
Wings
Go through Tube
Turn Around
Flighted Fetch
Slide
Basketball
Play Dead
Piggy Bank
Nod
Bowling
Darts
Climb Rope
Ring on Peg
Flip
Puzzle
Additional Top Articles
Treat Selection
Evolution of Flight
Clipping Wings
How to Put Parrot In Cage
Kili's Stroller Trick
Camping Parrots
Socialization
Truman's Tree
Parrot Wizard Seminar
Kili on David Letterman
Cape Parrot Review
Roudybush Pellets

List of Common Parrots:

Parakeets:
Budgerigar (Budgie)
Alexandrine Parakeet
African Ringneck
Indian Ringneck
Monk Parakeet (Quaker Parrot)

Parrotlets:
Mexican Parrotlet
Green Rumped Parrotlet
Blue Winged Parrotlet
Spectacled Parrotlet
Dusky Billed Parrotlet
Pacific Parrotlet
Yellow Faced Parrotlet

Lovebirds:
Peach Faced Lovebird
Masked Lovebird
Fischer's Lovebird
Lilian's (Nyasa) Lovebird
Black Cheeked Lovebird
Madagascar Lovebird
Abyssinian Lovebird
Red Faced Lovebird
Swindern's Lovebird

Lories and Lorikeets:
Rainbow Lorikeet

Conures:
Sun Conure
Jenday Conure
Cherry Headed Conure
Blue Crowned Conure
Mitred Conure
Patagonian Conure
Green Cheeked Conure
Nanday Conure

Caiques:
Black Headed Caique
White Bellied Caique

Poicephalus Parrots:
Senegal Parrot
Meyer's Parrot
Red Bellied Parrot
Brown Headed Parrot
Jardine's Parrot
Cape Parrot
Ruppell's Parrot

Eclectus:
Eclectus Parrot

African Greys:
Congo African Grey (CAG)
Timneh African Grey (TAG)

Amazons:
Blue Fronted Amazon
Yellow Naped Amazon
Yellow Headed Amazon
Orange Winged Amazon
Yellow Crowned Amazon

Cockatoos:
Cockatiel
Galah (Rose Breasted) Cockatoo
Sulphur Crested Cockatoo
Umbrella Cockatoo
Moluccan Cockatoo
Bare Eyed Cockatoo
Goffin's Cockatoo

Macaws:
Red Shouldered (Hahn's) Macaw
Severe Macaw
Blue And Gold Macaw
Blue Throated Macaw
Military Macaw
Red Fronted Macaw
Scarlet Macaw
Green Winged Macaw
Hyacinth Macaw

Winter Carrier for Transporting Parrots

Comments (4)

By Michael Sazhin

Thursday March 24th, 2011

In order to bring Kili and Truman to the high school for flight training sessions and to be able to take them places during the winter in general, I had to come up with a warm winter carrier solution. I decided to use an electric blanket but it would require a heavy car battery to power. Thus I needed to have a cart to be able to haul the weight of the heavy system. Furthermore, two carriers would be impractical and the blanket not large enough to cover both. So I set out to make a single carrier to transport both parrots.

I bought a larger version of Truman's carrier. I liked the top door feature which cannot be found on most carriers. Of course there is no way I could keep the parrots in the same chamber, so I modified the carrier to separate the two birds. I cut a piece of plexiglass to fit the contours of the carrier and divide the two parrots. I gave Truman the larger part of the carrier and just a small space for Kili. Truman doesn't do well in a confined space but Kili doesn't seem to mind it. I installed a perch for each parrot (similar to the first carrier I made for Truman but perpendicular to the side door instead).

Double Parrot Winter Travel Carrier

Top view of double parrot carrier

So now I load Kili in first through the top door and then Truman through the side door. Then I wrap the carrier in the electric blanket, place the battery on top, and then tie the entire assembly down to my cart. I have found that the electric blanket helps sustain heat but does not create much on its own. So I learned to put the carrier on top of a radiator for 30 minutes prior to loading the birds inside to make it nice and toasty. Then the electric blanket helps the carrier retain that heat longer while I have to move it outside and to the car. This is by no means the most convenient solution and turns out to be quite heavy, however, on frigid winter days, this is the only way to transport the parrots.

Winter Parrot Carrier


I will continue to use the double carrier year round for very short outings/trips with my parrots but will opt for two separate carriers for longer travels. Here is a video that shows some of the features of my double parrot travel carrier.

Building Parrot Travel Carrier For Truman

Comments (26)

By Michael Sazhin

Monday July 26th, 2010

For the long term, I wasn't particularly thrilled with the way the carrier Truman came in was set up. So I decided to start over and make a new one specific for him. I started by purchasing a small cat carrier at a typical pet store. Assembly was just the beginning of the makeover this carrier was about to get.

The first step for transforming a carrier into a parrot carrier is to add a perch. I went through some of Kili's old perches and found just the right one for Truman. I measured the best position for the perch and drilled a hole so that I could bolt the perch on to the carrier. Then I drilled additional holes near the top mesh door and front door. I use these holes to add an additional clasp to each door. My parrots are flighted so I take additional precautions in the event the carrier door fails or is coerced (by the parrot). I also use zip ties to secure every carrier clasp shut

I later added a food bowl ring to the carrier for being able to drop a food bowl in. I hung a toy from the cage top mesh and added a paper towel under the perch. The carrier was ready to go for testing. I brought Kili and Truman out for a family event in their respective carriers. I didn't feed them in the morning but instead let them eat in their carriers when I arrived. They were both hungry and ate marvelously. This served as an additional reward for being good in their carriers.

I much prefer the top loaded carriers with a door on the top than the classic side door only ones. Not only do I find it easier to clean the carrier this way, but it is also much easier getting the parrot in and out. By opening the top I can reach the parrot no matter where it is in the carrier and it can step up. Whereas with a side door design, you have to wait for it to come out or reach deep inside for it. Also it is easier to add toys and food bowls through the top down as well. So I definitely recommend spending the little bit extra and getting a top door (or two door) carrier than a side door only design.

Here is a video of the entire assembly process and all of the modifications I made for my parrot's new travel carrier.

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Trained Parrot is a blog about how to train tricks to all parrots and parakeets. Read about how I teach tricks to Truman the Brown Necked Cape Parrot including flight recall, shake, wave, nod, turn around, fetch, wings, and play dead. Learn how you can train tricks to your Parrot, Parrotlet, Parakeet, Lovebird, Cockatiel, Conure, African Grey, Amazon, Cockatoo or Macaw. This blog is better than books or DVDs because the information is real, live, and completely free of charge. If you want to know how to teach your parrot tricks then you will enjoy this free parrot training tutorial.
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